As advances in epoxy and silicone materials constantly evolve, manufacturers of advanced electronic systems will find that adhesives offer the ability to meet nearly any combination of requirements for thermal, environmental, and structural stability.

The combination of increasingly complex assemblies and exacting quality requirements is compelling design engineers to be extremely diligent when selecting materials for the assembly of medical electronic devices.In this white paper, we explore various polymer chemistries and what the different families of compounds have to offer for performance and processing requirements.

Selecting the right adhesive is a balancing act as engineers attempt to find products that meet conflicting end-use and manufacturability requirements. Medical device engineers also have to contend with a strict regulatory environment, and therefore often have the toughest time striking that balance.

Whereas some optical assembly applications require optical clarity across a certain wavelenth, others require an opaque coating. Optical grade epoxies, silicones and UV curable coatings provide the versatility to adhere well to a wide variety of substrates and the critical performance properties necessary.

The unique requirements of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) call for specialized materials. Versatile epoxy adhesives are often capable of providing the necessary properties to ensure support and protection from thermal and mechanical shock, vibration, high acceleration, particles, and other physical damage.

With the trend toward smaller and smaller electronic devices, unintentional EMI/RFI interference has become more of an issue. Shielding of these interferences is critical and coatings can be successfully applied as protection on the materials used.

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